convention

◆ En Route to #ASHA15

Traveling is always an interesting way to observe both how we communicate with one another, and how stress can impact communication. It can also remind you just how bizarre it can be to interact in worlds we consider familiar.

After arriving to the airport this morning, I found myself standing in line for security in front of an unusual man wearing sunglasses. He was friendly to a fault, and started talking to me despite my not having made eye contact, or even offering a 'good morning'. He wore dark sunglasses, slicked back hair, and carried a bag containing a suit jacket. Instead of a greeting, he said "I only need to show my boarding pass, right?"

We carried on in silence for a while, in part because when I travel, I like to retreat into my thoughts more than interact. Perhaps it's a means to handle the sheer number of people, though perhaps it's also because I hadn't yet had any coffee, so I wasn't feeling terribly social.

After a few minutes, he broke the silence again. "They don't have dog sniffers in Phoneix, do they?"

Setting aside the unusual turns this conversation took, I found myself thinking about my patients. How doe they handle these situations? Do my patients with aphasia try to talk when they travel, and if so, what sort of reception do they receive? What can I do to maximize their success in such situations, even in the early stages of therapy? It's so easy to take such "simple" communciation for granted.

This is a reminder to me that communication, and indeed language, are not simpley words and turns taken. It's the setting, the body language, the mental state of the people you're trying to interact with. It's the events that lead up to your arrival, and also to everyone else's arrival. It's the lights, the sounds, the smells, the stress.

I am on my way to the annual convention to meet my friends and colleagues, and to learn new things. I always look forward to this, and am excited for the advneture ahead.

◆ It's Conference Time Again!

The annual ASHA Convention is coming up in one week, so I’m gearing myself up for traveling, seeing some fantastic colleagues, and learning as much as I can. It hasn’t been long since I last attended a conference, and I’m looking forward to taking the lessons I learned there and bringing them to #ASHA15. The ASHA Convention is, by my rough estimation, just shy of ten times as large as the more intimate ASHA Healthcare and Business Institute (this estimation includes this year’s combination with ASHA Schools). While I think I prefer the intimacy of the smaller conference, I am nonetheless very excited for the convention ahead.

A little prep work can go a long way to ease the stress of such an enormous event. Here’s some things I’m doing this year differently than I have in years past, which I anticipate will make for a smoother and more productive experience.

  1. As I did for the Healthcare and Business Institute, I took the day off Wednesday so I could fly in earlier in the day. The extra time to check in to my hotel, unpack a bit, and explore the area has a huge impact on the experience as a whole. When you have three solid days of learning ahead of you, be good to yourself and don’t start the experience off with so much rushing.

  2. Though I will be tweeting throughout the convention, I will not be live-tweeting my sessions. I also won’t be typing notes on any of my various devices. I love my technology, for sure, but I found such a significant difference in what I took away from my sessions by writing my notes by hand that I will be doing so again. I may write a tweet here and there, for various powerful points during sessions. As always, you can find me tweeting @ProjectSLP.

  3. I have been planning my sessions ahead of time, and giving myself a few options for back-ups if I need. This alone reduces the stress of trying to figure out where to go, freeing up cognitive resources to better attend to what I’m trying to learn. It also has the benefit of making it easier to meet new colleagues along the way.

  4. I’m bringing a small backpack to carry around my convention program, my notebook, some pens, a water bottle, and snacks. I purposely keep the bag small to help keep me from acquiring too many things along the way. The exhibit hall is a wonderful place to visit but the number of papers and freebies really can add up. By making sure I have limited space, I only acquire things I know I will find useful, and it has the added benefit of keeping things simple. As the saying goes, less is more.

Also, if you want to come visit all the #SLPeeps from the internet, do consider joining in at the “unofficial” (non-ASHA-affiliated) tweet-up.

★ ASHA 2012

I'm currently sitting on a plane, roughly 39,000 feet in the air and give or take 400 miles away from Atlanta. It's my first time visiting the city and my second time to attend the yearly ASHA Convention. I've been looking forward to the convention for months, as have many others I know. To get a sense of the excitement, all one must do is check out the #SLPeeps hash tag on twitter. I myself have been tweeting a great deal about it.

I am excited for the things I get to learn, and I am equally excited about seeing my friends. I love being part of such a diverse and talented group of professionals, and I love that we all value professional and clinical growth opportunities. For many of us, our learning takes place just as much from one another as it does from conferences, journals, and workshops. I love that being an active member in this group has afforded me the chance to grow so much. I love the connections, personal and professional, and I love that meeting everyone in person is just like seeing old friends.

I hope everyone has a great convention, learns a ton, and goes home feeling energized and excited to bring new things into our daily lives as clinicians! I look forward to seeing everyone and getting a chance to enjoy visiting a new city. I have my convention gear and a camera at the ready. ASHA 2012, here we go!